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My World Challenge Award

These award requirements were updated on 26 January 2018. The previous award requirements can still be used until 31 January 2019, to allow for transition where necessary.

How to earn your award

  1. Learn about what makes up your local community and meet someone who serves your community such as a police officer, lifeboat crew, a coastguard, fire fighter, youth worker or nurse.
  2. Complete an activity to help people in your local community. This could be carol singing at a local care home, repairing paths at a nature reserve or helping to clear a garden for someone with a disability.
  3. Take part in at least one activity that reflects England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, or your part of the UK. These could be: dance and music, craft, festivals, food, sports and activities.
  4. Find out about, and take part in, an act of worship, reflection or celebration.
  5. Discuss your Beaver Promise to do your best and how your Promise can help remind you to do good things in your community.
  6. Do at least one activity to help you learn about the natural world around you. These could be: pond dipping, mini-beast hunting, growing something from seed, leaf printing, or something similar agreed with your leader.
  7. Take part in an activity from another country. You could learn your Promise in another language, make a dish from another country or create some artwork inspired by another country.

Guidance for Leaders

For each of the requirements of the award, guidance and ideas are provided below.

Learn about what makes up your local community and meet someone who serves your community
Beavers could find out about the different buildings and spaces in their local area, such as parks, community centres, faith buildings, libraries, police stations, shops and schools.  What are these spaces used for? Why are they important? What would happen if they weren’t there?

You could also look at whether there is anything missing in the community which Beavers think it might be useful to have access to. To complete this, you could play a game of ‘location bingo’, with Beavers walking around their local area, hunting for different services..

To meet someone who serves their community, Beavers could visit the workplace of a community member, or invite them to visit the Colony. Most local community organisations such as the ambulance service, fire brigade, lifeboat station and police welcome visits from Scout Groups.

Beavers who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their Safety Activity Badge or their Community Impact Staged Activity Badge.

Complete an activity to help people in your local community

You could involve the Beavers in choosing which community impact activity they’d like to complete, by running a vote in the section. The activity could be linked to something they’ve already learnt about for requirement one such as working with the local park warden to improve the park, visiting the elderly with a sketch or performance, a accessibility audit of their local area and present findings to the council and/or shops.

Opportunities may be available through A Million Hands. For example, you could adopt a stretch of canal with the Canal and River Trust or use the resources to learn about dementia and create something to share with residents in a local care home. Read about what the Colony at 81st Belfast did here.

Beavers who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their Community Impact Staged Activity Badge, to make a bigger difference in their area. If they’re supporting people with disabilities for this requirement, this links well with the Disability Awareness Activity Badge.

Take part in at least one activity that reflects England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, or your part of the UK. These could be: dance and music, craft, festivals, food, sports and activities.
Each part of the UK has a variety of local and regional activities and traditions to explore. These may be linked to festivals, or could be part of a party or celebration. Some examples include apple bobbing, bell-ringing, bonfire night celebrations, coconut shys, cheese rolling, egg decorating, morris dancing, maypole dancing, sheepdog trials, tossing the caber, well-dressing and welly-wanging.

Beavers who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their International Activity Badge, to explore the wider world.

Find out about, and take part in, an act of worship, reflection or celebration
For this requirement, you could be by doing something with your Colony like taking part in a Scouts Own or an act of remembrance for Remembrance Day.  If you’re planning a Scouts Own, guidance can be found here
and some suggested themes for reflection here.

If you’re planning a Remembrance Day event, guidance can be found here

Alternatively, Beavers could take part in activities in the section, such as celebrating a festival like Diwali or Holi, writing a reflection to use at the end of the Colony meeting, or running an activity from the Rise to the Challenge resource, which can be downloaded here.  ‘The World Around Us’ is a good activity to encourage Beavers to think about the world they live in, to reflect on things we can be grateful for, and to consider the impact they can have in the world.

Whatever the activity or event, remember to make it inclusive for Beavers of different faiths and beliefs within the Colony. Guidance on this can be found here.

Beavers who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their Faith Activity Badge.

Discuss your Beaver Promise to do your best and how your Promise can help remind you to do good things in your community
Reflective activities may feel like quite a change from the typical activities you run in the section, but it’s important to spend time thinking about what it means to be a Scout and to live by our Promise.  The various versions of the Beaver Scout Promise, along with a link to further information, can be found here.

You could do this through activities or discussions with the Colony about which Promise they make, what the Promise means and how they keep it, on a one to one basis. Alternatively, you could ask Beavers to talk to a Young Leader about this element. You could ask them about activities they have done recently at Beavers or things they’ve done to work towards achieving this award. Did they do their best in the activity? Did they help others? They could also think about the person they’ve met who serves the community. How do they help others?

This is not a requirement that can be done during one Colony meeting, but should be demonstrated over a period of time, as appropriate to the individual. For some Beavers, this could be an opportunity to show they can improve a specific aspect of their behaviour, like being kind to other people, for example.

Do at least one activity to help you learn about the natural world around you
This requirement is an opportunity for Beavers to do something practical and fun, which helps them to explore the physical world around them. Some activities could be started during a Colony meeting and completed at home. For example, Beavers could plant seeds during a meeting, then look after them at home. Why not try to grow an edible garden activity [PDF Magazine Summer term 2018] or make some animal feeders [PDF MDS Spring 2018] There are also some ideas within the My Outdoors Challenge Award resources which may be useful.

The Wildlife Trust and The Woodland Trust both have activity sheets for fun indoor and outdoor activities on the theme of nature and wildlife.

If you’re based in Scotland, check out these resources from Scout Scotland and the RSPB, to help Beavers explore nature and wildlife.

Beavers who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their Animal Friend, Explore, Gardener or Global Issues Activity Badges.

Take part in an activity from another country
There is a whole range of activities Beavers could complete for this requirement. The activity could be about the Country’s language(s), food, art, religion(s), games, weather or music. Beavers could take part in a celebration of a festival or national holiday, such as Chinese New Year.

Some ideas are provided in the Beaver International Activity Badge resource, which can be downloaded here.

Beavers who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their International Activity Badge.

Previous award requirements

These requirements will be discontinued on 31 January 2019.
 
How to earn your award
  1. Meet someone who serves the community. It could be a police officer, lifeboat crew, a coastguard, fire fighter, youth worker or nurse.
  2. Work with people or an organisation from a community. Take the chance to find an issue that your Colony could help with. It should be something that helps people and also helps you grow as a person. Plan and carry out the project with your Colony and others in the community. Then share what you learned from the activity with other people. Talk about how it helped other people and what you will do with the skills and experiences you have gained.
  3. Take part in three activities that reflect England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, or your part of the UK. They could be:
    • dance and music
    • craft
    • festivals
    • sports and activities.
  4. Find out about and take part in an act of worship, reflection or celebration.
  5. Do your best and show you have kept your Beaver Promise. Share or talk about what you have done with your Colony or a Leader.
  6. Do at least three of these things:
    • junk modelling
    • pond dipping
    • mini-beast hunting
    • growing something from seeds
    • leaf printing
    • something similar agreed with your leader
  7. Take part in activities from another country. You could learn the Promise in another language or make a dish from another country or culture.
Flexibility

Each young person who participates in the Programme, including badges and awards, should face a similar degree of challenge, and requirements can be adapted according to each young person’s abilities.  For more information and practical tips see our guidance on flexibility

Guidance for Leaders:

Beavers who have particularly enjoyed this Challenge Award may like to try these Activity Badges:


As well as the guidance below, Programmes Online contains lots of activity ideas that you could use to deliver this badge.

Meet someone who serves the community
This clause provides an opportunity either to go on a visit, or invite someone to visit your Colony. Most local community organisations, such as the police, fire brigade, ambulance service or lifeboat station welcome visits from Scouts. Don’t forget to make sure you have the right number of adults for your outdoor trip.

Take part in two activities to help people in your community
To meet this requirement Beavers should take part in activities which are based in their local community, for example helping the elderly, painting a wall, clearing a flowerbed or raising money for a local charity. Ideally they should be able to visit people or places that will benefit from what they are doing. This requirement can’t be met by raising money for a national charity, unless that charity has a branch or similar local to you.

One topic that Beavers could explore is refugees. The Refugee Response Resource provides information, guidance and activities to help Leaders explore the topic of refugees with their section, developing their understanding and supporting them to take action. Download the resource here.


Take part in three activities that reflect England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, or your Region of the UK.
Each part of the UK has a variety of local traditional activities. They may be linked to festivals, or could be part of a party or celebration. Some examples include sheepdog trials, welly wanging, egg decorating, cheese rolling, tossing the caber, coconut shy, guy fawkes, morris dancing, maypole dancing, well dressing, bellringing and apple bobbing.

Find out about and take part in an act of worship, reflection or celebration
This could be by doing something with your Colony like attending a Scouts Own or a remembrance day service, or reading a prayer or reflection at the end of the Colony meeting.

Remember to make this activity inclusive for young people of different faiths within the Colony, for example by using reflections or readings from children’s books rather than prayers or specific faith materials.

Do your best, and show that you have kept your Beaver promise. Explain what you have done to your Colony or a Leader
This requirement encourages Beavers to show that they have behaved in a way that meets the Beaver Promise. This is not a requirement that can be done during one Colony meeting, but should be demonstrated over a period of time appropriate to the individual.

For some Beavers, this could be an opportunity to show that they can improve a specific aspect of their behaviour, for example being kind to other people.

This requirement should be discussed with the Beaver, it should not be ticked off without them knowing they have completed it. You could do this through activities or discussions with the Colony about what the promise means and how they keep it, on a one to one basis, or you could ask Beavers to talk to a Young Leader about this element.

Do at least three of these things...
Other similar activities can be anything related to the environment. They should be practical, fun, and help Beavers to explore the world around them. Some activities could be started on a colony night and completed at home – for example planting seeds then looking after them at home.

The Wildlife Trust have activity sheets for fun indoor or outdoor activities on the theme of nature and wildlife, at wildlifewatch.org.uk/activity-sheets


Take part in activities about another country
There is a whole variety of activities that can be linked to life in other countries. The expectation of this requirement is that Beavers take part in around 4 different activities covering different topics, for example: national costume, language, food, currency, climate, musical instruments etc.

 

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