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International Activity Badge

These badge requirements were updated on 26 January 2018. The previous badge requirements can still be used until 31 January 2019, to allow for transition where necessary.

How to earn your badge

  1. Draw or create the World Scout Badge. Explain the meaning of each of its parts and talk about the advantages of being part of a global movement of Cub Scouts.
  2. Make, build or draw something to represent a country. Include things like its currency, national dress, cultures, customs and languages.
  3. Explore another country’s traditions and culture around food and eating. What time do they eat? How do they eat? How do they sit? What do they eat?
  4. Take part in the activities of a celebration or festival that usually takes place in another country. Explore why the celebration or festival happens. What are the customs of the event?


Top tips

For number 4, visiting a festival or holding a celebration as part of a Pack evening or Scouting event would be good. The festivals Mela, Holi, Mardi Gras and Chinese New Year are good examples 


Guidance for leaders

For activity ideas and inspiration, download the leaders' resource for this badge here.

You can also find more information about the World Scout Emblem and it's history here.

For a special experience, you can book for your section to complete this badge/award at some Scout Adventures centres. For information, prices and to book, click here.


Flexibility

Each young person who participates in the Programme, including badges and awards, should face a similar degree of challenge, and requirements can be adapted according to each young person’s abilities.  For more information and practical tips see our guidance on flexibility


Previous badge requirements

These requirements will be discontinued on 31 January 2019.

How to earn your badge

  1. Draw or create the World Scout Badge. Explain the meanings of each of its parts.
  2. Create a passport with information about a country. You include things like its currency, national dress, foods, religions, cultures, customs and languages.
  3. Cook a traditional dish from another country using an ingredient that you are not familiar with. Tell your leader what you liked or disliked about it.
  4. Take part in the activities of a celebration or festival that usually takes place in another country. Explore why the celebration or festival happens. What are the customs of the event?


Top tips

For number 4, visiting a festival or holding a celebration as part of a Pack evening or Scouting event would be good. Festivals Mela, Holi, Mardo Gras and Chinese New Year are good examples 


Flexibility


Each young person who participates in the Programme, including badges and awards, should face a similar degree of challenge, and requirements can be adapted according to each young person’s abilities.  For more information and practical tips see our guidance on flexibility


 

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