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Our World Challenge Award

These award requirements were updated on 26 January 2018. The previous award requirements can still be used until 31 January 2019, to allow for transition where necessary.


How to earn your award

  1. Create a community map. What services are there? Where are they? Who are they for? Try and visit one of these services if possible. 
  2. As a Pack, identify and complete an activity that benefits your local community. How did it help others? How did the activity help you? What could you do next?
  3. Take part in an act of worship, reflection or celebration.
  4. Find out about a faith or culture you are not familiar with. You could visit a place of worship or a cultural centre in your local community.  
  5. Talk about a time when you did your best. Explain how you have kept your Cub Promise and the Law.        
  6. Take part in an activity about the environment.
  7. Play a game that Cubs play in another country and learn their Promise.
  8. Celebrate a festival from another country or culture. You could celebrate Holi with a colour party, Brazilian carnival by making masks, or Diwali by making ginger ladoo sweets.

Guidance for Leaders

For each of the requirements of the award, guidance and ideas are provided below.

Create a community map
Cubs could create a map of their community by drawing or using photographs. They could even recreate a miniature version of their city, town or village at the meeting place, using props or images to represent the different services that are available locally.

Services featured on the map could include community centres, council offices, faith buildings, fire services, medical services, parks and shops. The services Cubs include on their map should be available in their own city, town, village or local area, and this requirement could be combined with a hike or a trip, searching to find and identify local services.

Cubs who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their Local Knowledge or their Community Impact Staged Activity Badge. Depending on what services they’ve learnt about. they could also work towards their Disability Awareness or Fire Safety Activity Badges.

As a Pack, identify and complete an activity that benefits your local community
The activity could be to support a service that Cubs learnt about for requirement one. Examples of activities could be collecting food to donate to a food bank, raising money to help a local hospital, improving an area of a local park or nature reserve to encourage more people to use it, or getting involved in a project to support refugees. The Refugee Response Resource provides information, guidance and activities to help Leaders explore this topic with their section, developing their understanding and supporting them to plan action. Download the resource here.

Opportunities may also be available through A Million Hands. For example, Scouts can connect with their local dementia service through the partnership with the Alzheimer’s Society, or adopt a stretch of canal with the Canal and River Trust.

The Sustainable Development Goals may provide some more inspiration for what activities may benefit your local community. These are global goals that people and governments all over the world are trying to achieve to make the world a better place. The World Organisation of the Scout Movement (WOSM) has committed to these, and they are reflected in the global elements of our programme. For further exploration of the SDGs, activities and resources are available from Scouts Scotland and Scotdec here.

Cubs who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their Community Impact Staged Activity Badge or their Environmental Conservation Activity Badge, to make a bigger difference in their community.  If they’ve looked at raising awareness of safety, this may combine well with the Fire Safety, Home Safety, Personal Safety or Road Safety Activity Badges.  If they’ve taken action around disability, they may like to work towards their Disability Awareness Activity Badge.

Take part in an act of worship, reflection or celebration
Cubs could take part in a Scouts Own or an act of remembrance for Remembrance Day, go to an event to celebrate a festival like Diwali, or complete a reflective activity from the Rise to the Challenge resource, which can be downloaded here.

If you’re planning a Scouts Own, guidance can be found here. Some suggested themes for reflection can be found here.
If you’re planning a Remembrance Day event, guidance can be found here.

Whatever the activity or event, make sure it’s inclusive for Cubs of different faiths and beliefs within the Pack.  Guidance on this can be found here.

Cubs who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their World Faiths Activity Badge.

Find out about a faith or culture you are not familiar with

A whole variety of activities could be done for this requirement, and this could be combined with celebrating a festival from another country for requirement eight.

When finding out about a faith, talking about the various versions of the Cub Scout Promise is a good place to start. For the faith they’re exploring, Cubs could find out about key belief and places of worship, as well as any particular practises (such as fasting or wearing particular clothing) and important dates throughout the year. For information from the Inter Faith Network about faith events throughout the year, click here.

When finding out about a culture, Cubs could learn about things like traditional art and crafts, clothing, dance, and music. As part of this, they could cook or taste traditional foods or try some crafts (eg making lanterns for Chinese New Year). Ideas can be found in the Cub International Activity Badge resource, which can be downloaded here.

Cubs who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their International, Global Issues or World Faiths Activity Badges.

Talk about a time when you did your best. Explain how you have kept your Cub Promise and the Law  
     
The Cub Scout Law and the various versions of the Cub Scout Promise, along with a link to further information, can be found here.

Reflective activities may feel like quite a change from typical activities in the section, but it is important to spend time thinking about what it means to be a Scout and to live by our Promise. 

You could do this through activities or discussions with the Pack about which Promise they make, what the Promise means and how they keep it, on a one to one basis. Alternatively, you could ask Cubs to talk to an Explorer Scout Young Leader about this element. For some Cubs, this could be an opportunity to show that they can improve a specific aspect of their behaviour.

This is not a requirement that can be done during one Pack meeting, but should be demonstrated over a period of time appropriate to the individual.

Take part in an activity about the environment
Why not try junk modelling [PDF of Magazine Spring term 2018], make a butterfly garden [PDF of MDS Summer 2018] or have a go at this activity to learn about pollution [PDF of Magazine Autumn term 2018]  There are further air pollution resources available here; ClairCity

Whilst Cubs are doing the activity, get them to think about how they already do to help the environment, what they could do more of, and why caring for the environment is a good thing to do.

Resources are available from The Climate Coalition as part of their Show the Love campaign, which focuses on helping to protect the people, places and life we love from climate change.  Access the activity ideas and instructions can be found here.

Cubs who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their Community Impact Staged Activity Badge and Environmental Conservation, Global issues or Naturalist Activity Badges. 

Play a game that Cubs play in another country and learn their Promise
Making contact with Scouting in other countries would be a great way to complete this requirement. For example, you could take part in an international event in the UK, get involved with JOTA JOTI or make your own international links, following the guidance here.

You can find links to information about Scouting in other countries on the WOSM website here.

Ideas for games and information about the Promise in different counties can be found below.

Australia
On my honour, I promise
To do my best,
To be true to my spiritual beliefs,
To contribute to my community and our world,
To help other people,
And to live by the Scout Law
OR
On my honour
I promise that I will do my best
To do my duty to my God, and
To the Queen of Australia
To help other people, and
To live by the Scout Law    

Australian Flag Puzzle Relay

Brazil    
I promise on my honour
To do my best possible to comply with my duties
To God and my Country,
To help fellow humans on every and any occasion
and to obey the Scout Law    

Luta de Galo

China    
I will do my best to love my country
and keep the Cub Scout Law.    

Catch the Dragon’s Tail


India    
On my honour, I promise that I will do my best
To do my duty to God* and my country,
To help other people and
To obey the Scout/Guide Law
The word ‘Dharma’ may be substituted for the word "God", if so desired    

Kho Kho

Israel    
I promise to do my best
To fulfill my duties
To my people, my country and my land,
To help others at all times
and to obey the Scout Law    

Go-Go-Im 

New Zealand     
On my honour, I promise to do my best,
To develop my spiritual beliefs,
To contribute to my community, country
and world,
To help other people,
and to live by the Scout Law    

Ideas can be found here

Cubs who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their International Activity Badge.

Celebrate a festival from another country or culture
Here are some ideas of festivals that Cubs could celebrate:
  • Diwali - The Hindu festival of lights, Diwali, and takes place in October or November. Some ideas of how to celebrate it with your section, can be found here.
  • Holi  - Known as the ‘festival of colours’, Holi is a spring festival celebrated all across the Indian subcontinent. Cubs could have a colour party. As part of this, why not head outside with some brightly coloured paints, and create a giant piece of art using footprints and handprints? Just ask Cubs to wear old clothes and use paint that is non-toxic and washable.
  • Carnival of Brazil - This is another spring festival, which marks the beginning of Lent, the forty-day period before Easter, in the Christian faith. Celebrations and parades are held throughout the country, so why not challenge your Cubs to create their own masks or costumes?
  • Chinese New Year - This is also known as Lunar New Year or Spring Festival and takes place on the first day the first month in the traditional Chinese calendar. Find some activity ideas here.

Cubs who particularly enjoyed this part of the award may like to work towards their International Activity Badge


Previous award requirements

These requirements will be discontinued on 31 January 2019.

How to earn your award

  1. Make a list of the services for people in your local area. Find out a bit about them, and visit one if possible.
  2. Work with people or an organisation from a community. Take the chance to find an issue that your Pack could help with. It should be something that helps people and also helps you grow as a person. Plan and carry out the project with your Pack and others in the community. Then share what you learned from the activity with other people. Talk about how it helped other people and what you will do with the skills and experiences you have gained.
  3. Take part in an act of worship, reflection or celebration.
  4. Find out about a faith or culture other than your own. You could visit places of worship or ceremony.
  5. Talk about a time when you did your best. Explain how you have kept your Cub Promise and the Law.
  6. Take part in an activity about the environment.
  7. Try a game played by Cubs in a different country, and learn their Promise.
  8. Celebrate a festival from another country. You might make (and eat!) some special food, make something relating to the festival or visit somewhere special.


Flexibility

Each young person who participates in the Programme, including badges and awards, should face a similar degree of challenge, and requirements can be adapted according to each young person’s abilities.  For more information and practical tips see our guidance on flexibility

Guidance for Leaders:

Cubs who have particularly enjoyed this Challenge Award may like to try these Activity Badges:

As well as the guidance below, Programmes Online contains lots of activity ideas that you could use to deliver this badge.

Make a list of the services in your local area. Find out a bit about them, and visit one if possible
Try to find fun ways of creating a ‘list’ – for example using pictures, drama, going on a walk around town, making a map and marking the services, or playing a game. You could arrange a visit, or invite someone in to visit your Pack – many local services will be happy to do this. Services could include doctors, fire, police, shops, ambulance, council offices, churches, recycling centre, skate park etc. These services should be in your own town, village or local area – if you live in a place where everyone has to travel for these kinds of service it would be relevant to link this clause to a day trip to somewhere local.

Take part in an activity to help your community
When completing this requirement Cubs should be involved in choosing what is done. There are a variety of ways of getting ideas from Cubs, and evaluating things with them. For this requirement you could go for a walk around the community and talk about things Cubs think could be better. You may need to provide some ideas, and get them to choose between them.

Some examples are: to picking up litter in your local park, raising money to help a local hospital, or taking part in a local community event.

One topic that Cubs could explore is refugees. The Refugee Response Resource provides information, guidance and activities to help Leaders explore the topic of refugees with their section, developing their understanding and supporting them to plan action. Download the resource here.


Take part in an act of worship, reflection or celebration
This could be by doing something with your Pack like attending a Scouts Own or a remembrance day service, or reading a prayer or reflection at the end of the Pack meeting.

Remember to make this activity inclusive for young people of different faiths within the Pack, for example by using reflections or readings from children’s books rather than prayers or specific faith materials.

Find out about a faith or culture other than your own
A whole variety of activities could be done to meet this clause, and they could be linked to a religious or cultural festival or red letter day. You could include a visit to a place or worship, food, clothes, craft (such as Chinese lanterns) or music.

Give an example of when you have done your best, and how you have kept your Cub Promise and Law
This requirement encourages Cubs to show that they have behaved in a way that meets the Cub Promise and Law. This is not a requirement that can be done during one Pack meeting, but should be demonstrated over a period of time appropriate to the individual. For some Cubs, this could be an opportunity to show that they can improve a specific aspect of their behaviour, for example being kind to other people.

Take part in an activity about the environment
For example you could turn some rubbish into something useful, plant bulbs, build a bug hotel or make bird feeders. Whilst Cubs are doing the activity get them to think about how they are helping the environment, and why this is a good thing to do.

Resources are available from The Climate Coalition, as part of their Show the Love campaign, which focuses on helping to protect the people, places and life we love from climate change.  Access the activity ideas and instructions here.

Try a game played by Cubs in a different country, and learn their Promise
Information about Scouting in other countries, including games and other activities, can be found on POL.

Take part in celebrating a festival from another Country
Why not theme a section night to complete this requirement. Festivals could include national celebrations, religious or cultural festivals. Some examples include Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Chinese New Year, Holi, Mardi Gras, St. Patrick’s Day, Passover Day, Victoria Day, African Liberation Day, Summer Solstice, Bastille Day.


 

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